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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2015 3:29 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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Just got back from AZ - gas price there is < $2.50/gal. :twisted: :-x :@

It's hard to see how gas stations just the CA side of the border can even survive when they have to charge an additional +$1/gal just to make up for the taxes. Needless to say, gas stations just on the AZ side were doing a brisk business.

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2015 10:56 am 
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Cornice Bowl
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UH OH! This is starting to sound a whole lot like the Mammoth Regional Airport. Am I dizzy from the spin from the CHSRA, or from watching this turd circle the bowl?
http://www.masstransitmag.com/news/12124558/california-bullet-train-project-is-attracting-interest-but-not-funding
Quote:
CA: California Bullet Train Project is Attracting Interest — But Not Funding
Ralph Vartabedian On Oct 9, 2015
Source: McClatchy

Since its earliest days of planning, California's $68-billion bullet train project has counted on a massive infusion of private capital to fill any gaps in state and federal funding. A new sounding of international interest in such investments indicates the money may not arrive any time soon. A solicitation issued to potential partners this year drew 36 responses from rail, construction and engineering firms around the world, offering what California High-Speed Rail Authority officials say are encouraging ideas and feedback that will aid future planning.

But the companies didn't signal a readiness to invest their money, according to the rail authority staff and board members. "They are not bringing their checkbook yet, but they are bringing their ideas, their interest, their commitment to work with us," said rail authority Chief Executive Jeff Morales.

With slim near-term prospects for additional state or federal funding, the project needs billions of dollars in private investment to supplement government funding as it tries to complete its first passenger-carrying segment. The companies that responded to the state solicitation left the door open to forming partnerships and making investments, but under terms that could be problematic for high-speed rail officials. Rail authority Chairman Dan Richard said the companies generally want either a revenue guarantee or a record of financially successful operations. A state-backed operating revenue guarantee would be a "nonstarter" under voter-approved financial protections placed on the project, said Michael Rossi, a retired Bank of America vice chairman and a rail board financial expert.

"There is no proposal, there is no commitment to do anything" in the responses, Rossi said at a board meeting this week. "We need to be very, very careful."

Nonetheless, the rail authority said the process will help formulate a plan to finish the project, which ultimately would connect Los Angeles and San Francisco. The agency did not immediately release the 36 responses. Rail board member Tom Richards said he was surprised by the expressions of interest in joining the project, saying the number of responses showed it is being taken seriously. Lisa Marie Alley, a spokeswoman for the rail authority, said the responses are "a clear signal from the private sector that they want to participate." Board members saw the responses as a "positive step forward," she said.

The rail authority is continuing to move ahead with available money, announcing Thursday that it had awarded a roughly $30-million oversight contract to Kansas City, Mo.-based HNTB for 22 miles of construction in the Central Valley. The state has about $15 billion in funding: $9 billion in bond proceeds approved by voters in 2008 and $3.2 billion in federal grants. Another $2.5 billion is expected to come from fees paid by businesses for generating greenhouse gases. But the cost of the initial 300-mile operating system from Burbank to Merced is an estimated $31 billion.

"We still have a funding gap," Richard acknowledged. "We need that other piece that is new money."

Hope had risen that the project would more quickly attract major private investment, after state legislators agreed to allocate an estimated $500 million annually to high-speed rail design and construction. As part of the solicitation process, the authority told companies they "would also need to provide financing to support a portion of the capital cost."

Richard said the responses had a "tremendous amount of thinking." But in terms of financial commitments, he added, "I just don't want to get ahead of ourselves in terms of what we are telling the public or ourselves."

Elizabeth Alexis, a co-founder of a Bay Area group critical of the rail authority's planning, said the results of the solicitation are a setback. She predicted there will be "some serious soul searching on the next step."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ralph.vartabedian@latimes.com

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2016 12:20 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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Now for something, completely different. And by that I mean, a project with actual interest from private investors who want to see it built - HYPERLOOP! What? That's just the crazy ramblings of an eccentric billionaire. No, no it isn't. Here's the latest from Las Vegas. As you are watching the video, keep in mind what he says near the end; they will have a working, full-scale prototype THIS YEAR. Not only that, but this is 1 of 2 teams working, competing actually, to push innovation as they share technology.

http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/traffic-transportation/hyperloop-one-triumphant-system-test-apex

What's the latest projection for having running trains on HSR? I'm guessing by the end of the year the answer will be "who cares?" HSR has no funding outside what the governor is able to steal from us in tax revenue (OK, carbon credits, same thing). Hyperloop is privately funded, 100%, with future investors lining up.

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 4:48 pm 
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Climax
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Hyperloop systems get a lot of support for their novelty and the 'cool factor,' but face the same fundamental cost issues as high-speed rail: land is expensive. At best, I expect the cost of the actual infrastructure to be comparable to HSR.

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 11:24 am 
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Cornice Bowl
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^ Except for you aren't buying the land with Hyperloop. It sits up on pylons so you aren't cutting off access from one side to the other - the very thing the farmers are fighting about with HSR. In fact, the farmers will barely even have to cut town any trees in their orchards. Tunnelling is far simpler because the vehicles are so much smaller. It would be more like a water tunnel than a train tunnel and those are constructed all of the time. Trains are expected to run much faster and with small enough units that all runs would be direct - no need to stop in Fresno if everyone on the train is headed to San Francisco. Dispatch times are expected to be only a couple of minutes apart so there is no set schedule.

Yes this is all speculative at this point because there is not even a working prototype - yet. Still, the upside is so much more attractive;
    >700 mph vs. 200mph for HSR (which we know it won't achieve because it has to stop so many times)
    30 min LA to SF vs 2:30 for HSR (which again, we know HSR won't do)
    100% privately funded vs. $69 billion in public money for HSR (which we know is a lie - it will be much higher before it makes the promised SF-LA route, let alone Sacramento or San Diego which was included in what we voted on).
    2 minute dispatch times vs. Hourly (?) Hard to say with HSR - it won't make whatever the projected passenger counts they are stating no matter what.
    No disruption to farming activities vs. cutting farms in half for HSR

So yeah, maybe Hyperloop can't do all of these things or can only do them half as well as projected. We know that HSR CAN'T do any of the things that camp is promising.

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:23 am 
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Cornice Bowl
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And the hits keep coming. Could this be the thing that will shake Gov. Brown back to reality, or will we get yet another epic denial?

http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/politics-columns-blogs/dan-walters/article136098388.html
Quote:
"...the financially challenged project had just suffered two immense hits, either of which could be fatal.

Just hours before the report was issued, results of the state’s latest cap-and-trade auction of greenhouse gas emission allowances – the only source of ongoing bullet train funds – were released and once again it produced almost no money.

Moreover, the report was aired just days after the Trump administration had put an indefinite hold on a $647 million grant for electrifying the Caltrain commuter rail service on the San Francisco Peninsula, a major component of the “blended” bullet train system."

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 11:04 pm 
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Rodger's Ridge
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Sounds like the rats are jumping off the sinking ship

http://www.latimes.com/local/california ... story.html


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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 2:02 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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So this happened;
http://www.breitbart.com/california/2017/07/14/hyperloop-one-just-killed-californias-high-speed-rail/

Quote:
Hyperloop One may have just killed California’s high-speed rail project, after the company’s 28-foot long aluminum and carbon-fiber production-scale pod hit its first milestone by traveling down a 1,640-foot near-zero-resistance vacuum tube test-track at a speed of 70 miles-per-hour.
The Verge reported that the Hyperloop One (H1) test pod achieved the equivalent of a rocket traveling in the ionosphere about 38 miles above the Earth, or about 5 times higher than the top altitude for a commercial jet.

Although it only took the H1 about 5 seconds to complete the 1,640-foot journey, the closed vacuum tube and unmanned transport pod’s 2G acceleration was flawless. The H1’s next milestone is a 250 miles-per-hour test late this year, and a 100-foot manned test pod in 2018. Hyperloop claims it can build out its system and begin moving commercial passengers and freight at speeds of up to 760 miles-per-hour by 2022.

Hyperloop’s development is sponsored by SpaceX’s CEO Elon Musk, who claims that he can build the Hyperloop One elevated tube system, stations and pods for $6 billion. That works out to a cost of about $11.5 million per mile to cover 381 transits between Los Angeles and San Francisco downtown stations. But due to the almost zero-friction vacuum tube travel, Musk claims a one-way ticket for the 35 minutes trip will cost about $20.

That H1 speed is substantially faster than the Boeing 747-8i — The Queen of the Skies — operated by Air China, Korean Air, and Lufthansa, which holds the top commercial airliner operating speed of 660 miles-per-hour. The 467-passenger configuration’s operating costs are $140 to $580 per passenger-hour, depending on peak and off-peak travel times.

There are three mag lev (magnetic levitation) trains in Asia that float above tracks, and many aerodynamically-shaped bullet trains that travel on tracks. But air friction and fuel consumption limit their maximum operating speeds to about 270 miles-per-hour for freight trains, and about 180 miles-per-hour for passenger trains. Their system costs are about $30 per passenger-hour.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority (CHSR) in 2009 estimated its 510-mile rail system would cost $42.6 billion to build and would achieve operating costs of $15 per passenger hour, based on a 2-hour-and-40-minute one-way trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco.

As Breitbart News noted in March, the build-out costs of the state-run project have escalated to roughly $93 billion, due to the cost of boring through huge mountains and buying up hundreds of miles of private land for the track right-of-way. CHSR had decided that its state-of-the-art bullet trains would travel through Silicon Valley on a “blended” system that includes 60-year old Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) rails, where commuter trains average speeds 35 miles-per-hour.

Due to the more-than-doubling build-out cost, and the 50 percent increase in travel time, the average CHSR cost-per passenger hour has now spiked to about $40.

Even if the high-speed rail has no more cost overruns or passenger delays, it will never be cost competitive with airlines that advertise dozens of round-trip L.A.-to-San Francisco flights each week.

Hyperloop One’s build-out costs will be a fraction of CHSR’s, because its elevated vacuum tubes will run along the existing rights-of-way on the 5 Freeway from L.A, up the Central Valley, and then across the BART lines to San Francisco.

Hyperloop One has raised $160 million from big venture capital, including 137 Ventures, Khosla Ventures, Fast Digital, Western Technology Investment, SNCF, the French National Rail Company, and GE Ventures.

Hitting its first production-scale milestone means H1 will soon raise huge amounts of cash to finish testing and begin a rapid build-out of a truly low-cost and high-speed rapid transit.


The author forgot to add that the HSR has failed to secure ANY ongoing funding outside of the money it is stealing from the CA residents through Cap and Trade. He also didn't mention that the CA route is one of about a dozen in the US that are being considered, not to mention lines being considered in Europe and the Middle East.
https://photos-3.dropbox.com/t/2/AAD34ZWm6ZpoMd0fG_HbrBGXtI8isO3fNz1Qk-A33acZfg/12/9281279/jpeg/32x32/3/1500084000/0/2/keyart_infographic.jpg/EO2G9QYY1tUBIAIoAg/RowP0Wasi29Za3aPlnxwjar6jMe6qFJf7XOGGmH5a3I?dl=0&size=800x600&size_mode=3

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 3:12 pm 
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Dave's Run
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breitbart, though? ugh

surely there is an objective news outlet that is covering the story with a critical view

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 Post subject: 192 MPH and counting!
PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 4:20 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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Hyperloop hit 192MPH in its latest test;
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/hyperloop-one-pod-hits-192-mph-in-test/ar-AApjtgA?li=AA4Zoy&ocid=ientp
Source = USA Today

Quote:
SAN FRANCISCO — Hyperloop One, just one a few tech startups hoping to create a transportation network of the future, announced Wednesday that it had succeeded in tripling the speed of its pod in a recent test outside of Las Vegas.

On July 29, Hyperloop One engineers successfully propelled a pod built for passengers or freight along a 500-meter stretch of vacuum-sealed, above-ground tubing at 192 mph, about triple the speed of its shorter test back in May.

The company says it depressurized the tubing to an air-pressure level that was equivalent to 200,000 feet above ground, and tripled the amount of electric-motor horsepower (3,100 hp) that was routed to the pod, which uses magnetic levitation technology to hover above the track much like an air hockey puck rides on air.

"We've proven that our technology works, and we're now ready to enter into discussions with partners, customers and governments around the world about the full commercialization of our Hyperloop technology," Hyperloop One CEO Rob Lloyd said in a statement.

Hyperloop One's test pod just hit nearly 200 mph in the Nevada desert.© Hyperloop One Hyperloop One's test pod just hit nearly 200 mph in the Nevada desert. Hyperloop One has entered into a variety of feasibility study agreements around the world, including with officials in the Middle East and Russia. Its rivals include Hyperloop Transportation Technologies and newly formed Arrivo, which was founded by former Hyperloop One co-founder Brogan BamBrogan.

Hyperloop was the name given to the new transportation system by Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, who wrote a white paper outlining the benefits of such a technology a few years ago.

Musk has never expressed interest in building a hyperloop company himself, but recently tweeted that he had received verbal government approval for his latest venture, tunnel-drilling firm The Boring Company, to bore out tunnels underneath a variety of East Coast states. His tweets said the tunnels would be for a hyperloop.

The first step for any hyperloop company would certainly be to prove to potential investors and partners that the tech actually works.

But even once that is achieved, challenges remain. They include making sure hundreds of miles of pressurized tubes can withstand natural forces without loosing pressure and assuring the public that traveling at up to 700 mph is safe. The biggest issue, however, will be finding municipalities or countries willing to take a multi-billion-dollar gamble on a new form of transportation.

Needless to say, as with most pioneers, today's hyperloop experimenters are optimistic they're working on what amounts to what the railroad was in the 1800 — a major revolution.

Shervin Pishevar, executive chairman and co-founder of Hyperloop One, said in a statement: "This is the beginning, and the dawn of a new era of transportation."


Total CA tax revenue expended = $0
Hey Jerry, what's the top speed on "HS"R?

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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:42 pm 
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Kiwi Flat
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Location: In the gurgling maw of the Pacific.
Currently?
Also zero.


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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:28 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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I wonder why companies like Apple, Google, facebook, Amazon or Tesla doesnt` take a shot at this. The government has got to know they could do a much better job and could still tax it??


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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 11:29 am 
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Rodger's Ridge
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Freerider wrote:
I wonder why companies like Apple, Google, facebook, Amazon or Tesla doesnt` take a shot at this. The government has got to know they could do a much better job and could still tax it??

Do you mean HSR? If so it's because they know it's a huge risk with very little chance of ever making a profit.


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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:10 pm 
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Cornice Bowl
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SurfnSnowboard wrote:
Freerider wrote:
I wonder why companies like Apple, Google, facebook, Amazon or Tesla doesnt` take a shot at this. The government has got to know they could do a much better job and could still tax it??

Do you mean HSR? If so it's because they know it's a huge risk with very little chance of ever making a profit.


I was talking about the Boondoggle..... ok HSR. Well you may be right but I thought other countries have successful HSR systems. If they can do it why not us?
Maybe I`m wrong and I surely have very little knowledge on the subject. I just think some current innovative companies could do a much better job.
My outlandish guess is if these innovative companies don`t want to do a land rail system one of them will come up with a low flying hi speed air system... that in our life time will probably never be approved by the governing agencies.


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 Post subject: Re: The High Speed Rail boondoggle
PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:07 pm 
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Rodger's Ridge
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Freerider wrote:
SurfnSnowboard wrote:
Freerider wrote:
I wonder why companies like Apple, Google, facebook, Amazon or Tesla doesnt` take a shot at this. The government has got to know they could do a much better job and could still tax it??

Do you mean HSR? If so it's because they know it's a huge risk with very little chance of ever making a profit.


I was talking about the Boondoggle..... ok HSR. Well you may be right but I thought other countries have successful HSR systems. If they can do it why not us?
Maybe I`m wrong and I surely have very little knowledge on the subject. I just think some current innovative companies could do a much better job.
My outlandish guess is if these innovative companies don`t want to do a land rail system one of them will come up with a low flying hi speed air system... that in our life time will probably never be approved by the governing agencies.

HSR can be profitable. Just depends on the route and how expensive it is to build. In many countries the cost and/or the profitability of the route isn't a concern. But to a private company the ROI is often the deciding factor.


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